Tim Knifton

The Lost Alfas

One of the places that was definitely on my list to visit in Belgium was the “Lost Alfas” – a clue in the title what this entailed. Six Alfa Romeo 1960s sport cars left to rot in the bowels of an abandoned castle somewhere in Belgium.

We woke at 5am, ate, got dressed and prepared to drive the hour to the place where we knew they were located. After finding a place to park, we decided to walk to the area where the castle was and negotiate our way through.

After several attempts at walking across a field or two, exploring several barns and a courtyard and seeing lights on in the house, we reported back to the others that the castle was over the gate but no clear way to get to it from where we were situated. On this news, one of our guys went for a walk to find an alternative route. Within five minutes the access was found. We then made our way down the driveway in the emerging light of sunrise towards the castle.

On arrival at the castle, we ventured through the grass and found an archway underneath the castle, this looked promising so pressed on a little further and discovered the cars and this beauty below.

“Feeling blue”

On discovering this, we all quietly gathered in the room just inside the garage to set up ready for the early morning’s photography, silently happy that we had succeeded in finding this gem.

History

Alfa Romeo Automobiles S.p.A. (Italian pronunciation: [ˈalfa roˈmɛːo]) is an Italian manufacturer of cars. Founded as A.L.F.A. on June 24, 1910, in Milan, the company has been involved in car racing since 1911, and has a reputation for building expensive sports cars. The company was owned by Italian state holding company Istituto per la Ricostruzione Industriale between 1932 and 1986, when it became a part of the Fiat Group, and since February 2007 a part of Fiat Group Automobiles S.p.A.

Alfa Romeo has competed successfully in many different categories of motorsport, including Grand Prix motor racing, Formula One, sportscar racing, touring car racing and rallies. They have competed both as a constructor and an engine supplier, via works entries (usually under the name Alfa Corse or Autodelta) and private entries. The first racing car was made in 1913, three years after the foundation of the company, and Alfa Romeo won the inaugural world championship for Grand Prix cars in 1925. The company gained a good name in motorsport, which gave a sporty image to the whole marque. Enzo Ferrari founded the Scuderia Ferrari racing team in 1929 as an Alfa Romeo racing team, before becoming independent in 1939.

From what I have found on the internet, the cars in the garage were as follows:

  • Giulia 1600 Spider hardtop (red) (’62)
  • Giulia 1600 spider Hardtop (Blue) (’62)
  • Alfa Romeo 1300 Sprint (’64)
  • Alfa Giulietta 1300 SS Super Sprint (’61)

Now you’ve had the story, on with some photos from the morning.

Technical

I tend to try to shoot on a low ISO even on a full frame camera and the morning’s light and cramped conditions, alternating between basic light painting with torches and low light natural photography was the order of the day. All photos were taken as HDR with +2 stop exposures tending to be 30 seconds.

On with a selection of the photos:

“B”

“Dashboard”

“Longterm Parking”

“Milano”

“O X 901″

“Opentop”

“Past it’s best”

“Pull up to my bumper”

“Scuderia”

“Spare parts”

We left the garage and made our way back to the car a few hours later confident that we had a few hours of fantastic photography and a unique explore in the bag.

Thanks for reading.

About these ads
This entry was published on November 9, 2012 at 7:21 pm. It’s filed under Cars, HDR, Photography, Transportation, Travel, Urbex photography and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

9 thoughts on “The Lost Alfas

  1. Great photos, thanks for sharing.

  2. Dear Mr. Knifton

    Via “Classic Driver” a became acqainted wirth your geat site and wonderful pictures. Hats off.

    I do send out a biweekly vintage car newsletter here in Switzerland and would like to ask you whether i could use one of your picturese to link to this page, The Lost Alfas?

    The last Newsletter http://goo.gl/BAIQm (not a permannent link)

    Thank you very much for your answer in advance.
    Kind regards
    Ruedi Mueller

  3. Pingback: Estes Alfa Romeo estão abandonados há décadas em um castelo - Jalopnik Brasil

  4. Leonardo on said:

    Hey Tim, really nice mixture of beauty and horror. I am an Alfa Romeo collector, and this brakes my heart, but the pictures are wonderful. I see you like exploring abandoned places. Are you on Flickr? I’d like to be able to talk to you more about this. Thanks!

  5. someone once had some taste for sure, wonderful photos, shame to let these works of art deteriorate so?

  6. Very nice work, I like your series better than these.

    http://barnfinds.com/belgian-alfa-romeo-barn-finds/

    Also no where is there any information about The History of these particular cars. Who raced some of them? their current owner? who was the original collector?
    Is this “Top Secret” info? Or does no one know?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,413 other followers

%d bloggers like this: